Monday, January 30, 2006

Nine Swans A Swimming...

OK - so I didn't manage to capture all 9 swans at once, but here are five of them!

I was visiting friends who have a home on the Shrewsbury River on the coast of NJ. They had been telling me about a pair of swans that came by once or twice a day. Bird Lady that I am, I was hoping to catch a glimpse of them while I was there.

Wouldn't you know, but I hadn't even sat down yet when a pair of swans came a-swimming along... followed by another pair... and another... until a total of nine graceful swans were swimming by the house. My host told me to go on out to the dock and the swans would come up close - looking for food, of which I had none. I did. They did. And so you have some close-up photos of these beautiful birds on the water.





Before I even left home this morning, I managed to capture Mr. Cardinal a couple of times...


All in all, a pretty good birding day, wouldn't you say?!!!

9 comments:

mary m. said...

Pat, those swans knew you would be arriving on the Shrewsbury River (a little birdie told them), that's why they made their appearance. Great photos!

See ya Thursday!!!!

teri springer said...

Pat, did you realize that you have two different species of swan there? The ones with the orange and black beaks are mute swans. The one with the all black beak is a trumpeter! They used to be non-existant in the lower 48. A neighbor of mine is one of the people responsible for reintroducing them to Michigan and, since the Kellogg Bird Sanctuary is right down the road, we ended up with a pair on our pond. Unfortunately the male killed himself while swimming- he bit the electric fence. Thankfully Joe Johnson was able to get the female to remate (very unusual).

Thanks for the great pictures!!

teri

deb said...

I was going to pipe up about the two species but Teri beat me. When I lived in the Lpwer Hudson Valley region of NY, I took part in enumerating mute swans that wintered on the huge systems of resevoirs that serve NYC.
HUNDREDS and hundreds would be gathered in several areas for most of the winter. Come late March, the multitudes would depart leaving one or two nesting pairs on each pond or lake in the system. Wonderful to behold.

Elle said...

I'd definitely say you had a good birding day!

Scrapmaker said...

I love your bird pictures! I would be thrilled to see them so close. We sit in our back yard and watch hawks, but there aren't any nearby swans. Jen

Neasa said...

You have such a beautiful blog - may I link to it in mine? http://www.pvnh.blogspot.com/

I used to quilt quite a bit & am about to start a new one - but it's been several years, so I know I'm rusty. I love the mixed-media quilts, especially the ones with the antique photos.

Regards, Neasa

Pat's Place said...

Wow. Thank you all for your kind words of appreciation. Special thanks to Teri & Deb for their teachings on Swans. I had to go explore more swan medicine after that, of course. More on that in my next posting!

Anonymous said...

Awesome. And I love cardinals =)

swanman in england said...

Hi name is mike and I live on the riverside in Shrewsbury England on the bank of the river Severn. we have some really beautiful mute swans that I hand feed and now after three years can whistle them in for a feed, beautiful graceful creatures and I spend hours talking to them /boy Im sure they understand me. why not try www.swansincoleham.blogspot.com and also www.shrewsburyswans.blogspot.com

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